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My interest in the Dryden family history has taken many years to develop. It has come to me through three ladies.


1: Nana Moore descibed to me by my Mum as a real "Lady". "She was kind and cared about Nanny and us". I never really knew who this person was but I heard of her many times over the years.
2: An old lady we visited each summer holiday in the nursing home. My memory of this time was of the craft room where my Mum seemed more interested in the craft than this old lady did. I never really understood who this lady was but we continued to visit he until she passed away.
3: The name Ogle Moore that has niggled away at me for years. John James Ogle Moore (my grandfather) his Mum was a Dryden. I did not know who she was.

As it turns out Nana Moore was the old lady that we visited each summer in the nursing home and she was married to an Ogle Moore. My great grandfather in fact. She was my grandfathers mother. She was Mary Dryden and she is all of the aforementioned ladies and the woman who has bought me to the Dryden family history all these years later.

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Wednesday, December 29, 2010

John and Mary

John Dryden married Mary McLeod in Carlsrhue, Mt Macedon, Victoria on 10 Jun 1864 in this little church.
 

John was born in Northumberland, UK in 1843 and died in Western Australia in 1923 aged 80 years. He arrived in Australia in 1851 with his parents and a brother William Edward Dryden
(1839 - 1914). They settled in the Mt Macedon area where his Uncle was a prominent landowner and orginal settler of the area known as "Drydens Run". John died 8th Nov 1923 in Perth Western Australia, aged 78 years.
His wife Mary McLeod was born on the Isle of Skye in Scotland in 1843 and migrated to Australia. Mary died in Western Australia in 1931, aged 85 years.
John and Mary had 14 children and spent part of their life in Australia in Newham, Victoria and the remainder in Western Australia. They are both buried at the Karrakatta Cemetery in Western Australia.

7 comments:

  1. Hi Stephanie, I came across your blog quite by accident and I'm hoping that you are still actively involved in researching your family history. I live in Carlsruhe and have been very interested in the history of the area for quite some time. I'd love to know where you got the photo of the church from - I live just around the corner from it and the earliest photo I have is from around 1920. It would be great to hear from you. Thanks, Samantha

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    1. HI Samantha What a lovely part of Australia you live in. I visited a couple of years ago and went to see the little church. I took this image form the internet and now I am very cross with myself because I cannot find the site. A lesson to me to reference everything. My apologies Stephanie

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  2. Hi there, we are long lost relatives, Annie Hope (nee Dryden) was my Great Grandmother. I'm reading a great book about early Mt Macedon history with plenty of interesting stuff on the Drydens. Called "Echoes of the Past - A history of Newham and Cobaw" by Jaynnyse Williams. 2 of Annie's Granddaughters still alive in Perth. Thanks for the info. Tim K Jones

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    1. Wow Tim that means we are blood relatives. Must try to get hold of that book. I also live in Perth.

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  3. I have a relative Julia Reynolds who married Adam Glascott in 1854. Their daughter ( Julia ) married John Dryden in 1862 . Julia Glascott died at Julia and John Drydens house in 1917 and was buried in the Carlsruhe Cemetery in 1917. Perhaps John was the son of William Edward Dryden.

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    1. HI Margaret, he could well be William's son. I have not got details on who that John Dryden married. I visited Carlsruhe some years ago but did not find a lot of information.

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  4. Just an interesting factoid, Annie Hope had the first dairy in Ultimo, Sydney with her husband. Sadly her husband died and she remarried, my Grandfather didn't get on with the stepfather, said he was cheating on her. The stepfather indentured him (read sold off as a slave) aged 14 to go sandlewood cutting in outback WA. Fortunately, a kindly Aunt living in Perth (your ancestor?) paid the owner of the indenture to let Harold have time off to holiday in Perth. She arranged for him to do the PMG exams which he passed and skipped the indenture to work on telegraph electronics. He went to Gallipoli, shot through the chest and lucky to survive - recovered in Egypt thanks to a local male nurse. Family tale is that the male nurse was in fact a doctor but the British Brass wouldn't recognise his qualifications. The story goes that he used to sneak a tiny bottle of some glupe that he would put in the wounds (entry and exit, exit was the big one) each day. He ended up a manager of some significant PMG offices in South West WA but died early, fell off a racehorse he was training down Leighton Beach. Think it dislodged some shrapnel left in his chest, my Mum said he was the best.

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